2018 Henry Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Awards

The Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation has selected eight Henry Dreyfus Teacher-Scholars for 2018. The award provides an unrestricted research grant of $60,000 to young faculty at primarily undergraduate institutions who are accomplished researchers and committed educators. Nathan Bowling, University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point Controlling Conformations of Unsaturated Molecules Justin K. Hines, Lafayette College Impact of Amino Acid Content on Amyloid and Molecular Chaperone Interactions in Live Cells R. Jeremy Johnson, Butler University Mycobacterial Serine Hydrolases and their Roles in Dormant Tuberculosis Infection Jefferson Knight, University of Colorado Denver Chemistry of Interfacial Protein-Membrane Interactions Central to Insulin Secretion Greg Springsteen, Furman University Protometabolic Pathways Toward the Origin of Life Korin E. Wheeler, Santa Clara University Toward Prediction of Nanoparticle Biomolecular Interactions and Reactivity Nathan T. Wright, James Madison University Towards Stabilizing Disease-causing Desmoplakin Mutations Kristin L. Wustholz, The College of William & Mary Development of Stimulus-Responsive SERS Probes for Biosensing

2018 Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Awards

The Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation has selected 13 Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholars for 2018. These young faculty have each created an outstanding independent body of scholarship and are deeply committed to education. The frontier accomplishments of these award recipients span the broad range of contemporary research in the chemical sciences. Each Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar receives an unrestricted research grant of $75,000. Alexander B. Barnes, Washington University in St. Louis Magnetic Resonance Technology for In-cell NMR Structural Determination of HIV Latency Reversal Agents Amie K. Boal, The Pennsylvania State University Watching Metalloenzymes at Work Abhishek Chatterjee, Boston College A Genetically Encoded Toolset to Unravel the Roles of Post-translational Modifications in Human Biology Irene A. Chen, University of California, Santa Barbara Probing Known Unknowns in Systems Biology Francesco A. Evangelista, Emory University Quantum Renormalization Group Methods for Excited States of Strongly Correlated Electrons Danna Freedman, Northwestern University Applying Inorganic Chemistry to Challenges …

Dreyfus Recognized at Spring 2018 ACS National Meeting

At the Spring 2018 national meeting of the American Chemical Society, the Dreyfus Foundation was recognized for 25 years of support of the ACS Award for Encouraging Women into Careers in the Chemical Sciences & the ACS Award for Encouraging Disadvantaged Students into Careers in the Chemical Sciences. Pictured are Dreyfus Board members Richard Zare & Scott Walter with Dorothy J. Phillips, ACS Director-at-Large.

Michele Parrinello, 2017 Dreyfus Prize Winner

Meet Michele Parrinello, Professor of Computational Sciences at the Università della Svizzera italiana and ETH Zurich, and winner of the 2017 Dreyfus Prize in the Chemical Sciences. The 72-year old, soft-spoken Sicilian-born professor is unsurpassed in his contributions to the field of computational chemistry, continuously improving methodologies for simulating the behavior of atoms and molecules. His research has paved the way for a better understanding of biological and chemical reactions, critical to the development of new materials, renewable energy sources and drug therapies, and to a better understanding of the natural world. The Car-Parrinello method, published in 1985, vaulted the field of computational chemistry by innovatively combining molecular dynamics (the simulation of how atoms and molecules move) with a quantum theoretical approach to electron structure. Together with fellow researcher Roberto Car, Parrinello developed first principles equations for modeling chemical reactions and structural phase transitions that occur when interatomic bonds break …

2017 Henry Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Awards

The Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation has selected seven Henry Dreyfus Teacher-Scholars for 2017. The award provides an unrestricted research grant of $60,000 to young faculty at primarily undergraduate institutions who are accomplished researchers and committed educators. Lauren Benz, University of San Diego The Surface Chemistry of Complex Materials Juliane Fry, Reed College NOx and Particulate Matter: Determining the Chemical Mechanisms Behind Regional Air Pollution Amelia Fuller, Santa Clara University New Functions of Biomimetic Oligoamides as Sensors for Water Contaminants John Gilbertson, Western Washington University Bioinspired Movement of Protons and Electrons for Small Molecule Activation Benjamin Swarts, Central Michigan University Illuminating the Mycobacterial Cell Wall through Undergraduate Chemical Biology Research Helen White, Haverford College Physicochemical and Biochemical Insights into the Cycling of Organic Contaminants in Marine Environments Douglas Young, The College of William & Mary Application of Unnatural Amino Acids to Prepare Multivalent Bioconjugates

Michele Parrinello Wins Dreyfus Prize

The Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation has announced that Michele Parrinello, Professor at USI Università della Svizzera italiana and ETH Zurich, has won the 2017 Dreyfus Prize in the Chemical Sciences, conferred this year in Theoretical and Computational Chemistry. The international prize, awarded biennially, consists of $250,000, a medal, and a citation. The award ceremony will be held at USI Università della Svizzera italiana in Lugano, Switzerland, on September 20 and will include a lecture by Parrinello. Parrinello is honored for his groundbreaking developments of molecular dynamics simulation methodology and associated landmark studies of chemical, material, and biomolecular systems. “Innovations in theoretical and computational chemistry underpin our understanding of biological interactions, chemical dynamics and structure, as well as many beneficial chemical technologies. Michele Parrinello is a giant in the field, whose innovations are widely used in chemistry, biology, materials science, and engineering,” stated Matthew Tirrell, Chair of the Dreyfus Foundation …

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2017 Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Awards

The Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation has selected 13 Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholars for 2017. These young faculty have each created an outstanding independent body of scholarship and are deeply committed to education. The frontier accomplishments of these award recipients span the broad range of contemporary research in the chemical sciences. Each Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar receives an unrestricted research grant of $75,000. Chase Beisel, North Carolina State University Understanding and Exploiting the Biochemical Properties of CRISPR-Cas Immune Systems Brandi Cossairt, University of Washington The Synthetic Inorganic Chemistry of Sustainable Technologies Jason Crawford, Yale University Decoding Specialized Bacterial Metabolic Pathways in the Human Microbiome Aaron Esser-Kahn, University of California, Irvine Chemical Methods to Understand and Improve Vaccines Alison Fout, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Ligand Influences on Base Metals for Multi-Electron Reactions Randall Goldsmith, University of Wisconsin-Madison New Technologies for Single-Molecule Spectroscopy: Optical Microresonators, Fluorescent Catalysts, High Concentrations, and Cancelling Brownian Motion …

2017 Dreyfus Prize Topic Announced

The Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation has selected Theoretical and Computational Chemistry as the topic of the 2017 Dreyfus Prize in the Chemical Sciences. The Dreyfus Prize, awarded biennially, recognizes an individual for exceptional and original research in a selected area of chemistry that has advanced the field in a major way. The prize consists of a monetary award of $250,000, a medal, and a certificate. “Each Dreyfus Prize highlights major accomplishment in a different area of the chemical sciences. We consider, in addition, the promise of benefit to society,” said Matthew Tirrell, chair of the Dreyfus Foundation Scientific Affairs Committee. “Innovations in theoretical and computational chemistry are deeply significant and underpin our understanding of biological interactions, chemical dynamics and structure, as well as many beneficial chemical technologies.” The deadline for nominations is March 2, 2017. Further details may be found at: http://www.dreyfus.org/Prize/prizenomination.shtml

2016 Henry Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Awards

The Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation has selected 7 Henry Dreyfus Teacher-Scholars for 2016. The award provides an unrestricted research grant of $60,000 to young faculty at primarily undergraduate institutions who are accomplished researchers and committed educators. Fadi Bou-Abdallah, State University of New York at Potsdam Iron Oxidation and Deposition Mechanisms in WT Heteropolymer Ferritins and Ferritin Variants Causing Neuroferritinopathy Timothy B. Clark, University of San Diego Metal-Catalyzed Borylation Reactions Kelling J. Donald, University of Richmond Weak Interactions and Chemical Bonding Phenomena in Inorganic and Organic Systems: Understanding, Predicting, and Applying Jane M. Liu, Pomona College Molecular Understanding and Applications of Bacterial RNAs Katherine E. Plass, Franklin & Marshall College Engineering Copper Sulfide Nanoparticles to Modulate Ion Exchange and Photocatalysis Matthew T. Whited, Carleton College Exploiting Metal/Main-Group Cooperation in Small Molecule Activation Liliya A. Yatsunyk, Swarthmore College Deciphering the Structure and Dynamics of Quadruplex DNA and DNA-ligand Complexes

2016 Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Awards

The Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation has selected 13 Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholars for 2016. These faculty are within the first five years of their academic careers, have each created an outstanding independent body of scholarship, and are deeply committed to education. The frontier accomplishments of these award recipients span the broad range of contemporary research in the chemical sciences. Each Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar receives an unrestricted research grant of $75,000. Andrew Boydston, University of Washington Functional Materials Across Multiple Length Scales Luis Campos, Columbia University Development of Materials for Next Generation Solar Cells William Chueh, Stanford University Ion Insertion Electrochemistry at the Molecular- & Nano-scale Neal Devaraj, University of California, San Diego Site-Specific Covalent Tagging of RNA for Live Cell Imaging and Affinity Purification Mircea Dinca, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Teaching Sponges New Tricks: Charge Transport and Heterogeneous Catalysis in Microporous Metal-Organic Frameworks Naomi Ginsberg, University of California, Berkeley Elucidating …