The Dreyfus Prize in the Chemical Sciences

 

George Whitesides accepts inaugural Dreyfus Prize in the Chemical Sciences

Medal

Dr. George M. Whitesides, the Woodford L. and Ann A. Flowers University Professor of Chemistry at Harvard University, accepted the inaugural Dreyfus Prize in the Chemical Sciences, on September 30, 2009, at an afternoon ceremony at Harvard University's Pfizer Lecture Hall in the Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology. Picture: Dr. George M. Whitesides (r) accepting the inaugural Dreyfus Prize from Henry C. Walter, President of the Dreyfus Foundation.

Related links:

Press release from the Dreyfus Foundation

The Whitesides Laboratory (Harvard)

Description of the Dreyfus Prize

A video of the Award Ceremony is available HERE.

Photographs of the Dreyfus Prize ceremony and reception are available.

 

George Whitesides, first recipient of the Dreyfus Prize in the Chemical Sciences

 

George M. Whitesides, the Woodford L. and Ann A. Flowers University Professor of Chemistry at Harvard University, has won the inaugural Dreyfus Prize in the Chemical Sciences. The prize recognizes his revolutionary advancePrizes in the chemistry of soft materials. Whitesides has developed powerful methods for the creation of new materials that have significantly advanced the field of chemistry and its societal benefits. His research extends across multiple disciplines, centered on chemistry, but touching biochemistry, drug design, and materials science. His work extends to the engineering of functional systems and the applications of these systems in areas ranging from biology to microelectronics. He has opened broad new technological avenues and has impacted human health in significant ways. Whitesides's research in materials chemistry has become an essential part of materials synthesis programs around the world.

 

"I'm particularly pleased and honored by this award from the Dreyfus Foundation. Its work in raising public awareness of chemistry is helping to educate young people about the transformative power of this science," said George Whitesides. "Chemistry has the opportunity of a century to do something profound for society. The whole area of materials chemistry, including challenges in energy, water, conservation, sustainability - commodity infrastructure - is up to us, as chemists, to work through."

 

The prize, to be given biennially by the Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation, recognizes exceptional and original research in a selected area of chemistry that has advanced the field in major ways. Conferred this year in materials chemistry, the prize consists of a monetary award of $250,000 - one of the largest awards dedicated to the chemical sciences in the U.S. - a citation and a medal. The award ceremony will be at Harvard University on September 30, and will include a lecture by Dr. Whitesides.

 

Related links:

Press release from the Dreyfus Foundation

The Whitesides Laboratory (Harvard)

Description of the Dreyfus Prize